Joint Convention of Bi-cameral Government Convened Monday: More than 60 Former, Present Members of the Body on Hand to Record History

October 3, 2013
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The final joint convention was a celebratory event, as former Aldermen and Councilors joined the current members in saying goodbye to the city’s bi-cameral form of government. Pictured, at back from left, former mayors John Hanlon and Bill Appruzese, State Senator Sal DiDomenico, Mayor Carlo DeMaria and former Mayor David Ragucci. Front from left, Common Council President John Leo McKinnon and Aldermanic President Sal Sachetta.

The final joint convention was a celebratory event, as former
Aldermen and Councilors joined the current members in saying
goodbye to the city’s bi-cameral form of government. Pictured,
at back from left, former mayors John Hanlon and Bill Appruzese,
State Senator Sal DiDomenico, Mayor Carlo DeMaria and
former Mayor David Ragucci. Front from left, Common Council
President John Leo McKinnon and Aldermanic President Sal
Sachetta.

With just a little over three months remaining in Everett’s first form of municipal government, members of the Boards of Aldermen and Common Council – past and present – convened in the Council Chambers Monday night to witness the final Joint Convention of city government before the new city government takes over on January 1, 2014.

More than 60 current and former members of the council came together for the ceremonial Joint Convention, as a way celebrating and saying goodbye to the bi-cameral government that has been the ruling body of Everett for most of its history.

Among those present at the celebration were former mayors Bill Appruzese, John Hanlon and David Ragucci and Senator Sal DiDomenico, all of whom spent at least a portion of their political careers in one chamber of the council or the other.

One-time, one-term councilor James Keane joked that he was surprised he’d been invited, since his sole term on the Common Council resulted in the Charter Change that ultimately led to Monday evening’s celebration and the coming end of the old form of city government.

“I’m part of the reason that we’re having a final joint convention,” said Keane, who was a known proponent of a charter committee when he took office.

Keane said that he was happy to be a part of the celebration of the old form of government that served the city so well for so long, but also looks forward to the coming new government.

“People say to me that with only 11 councilors, the Mayor will have more power,” said Keane. “But to that I say that the only thing that really matters is the integrity of the people that are on that panel.”