What it Takes to be Mayor of Everett

April 20, 2011
By

Running Everett is an art form.

This isn’t an easy place to rule over even in the best of times.

Our history in the city goes back to the David Ragucci era and so we came to know how Everett was run from the corner office by watching Ragucci go through his thing.

Ragucci, it turns out, was a very sharp operator.

He knew how to run this city when running it was tough politically.

He treated his friends like friends. He treated his enemies like enemies.

Ragucci had to be tough. And in retrospect, he was no pushover.

In addition, he was loyal to nearly all of those who were loyal to him.

As the city changed, Ragucci didn’t really change with the times – and when his last run for office went down, he lost to John Hanlon – who had tried twice before.

He lost to Hanlon because the voting demographic had changed and because so many people had become disenchanted with his administration.

Bottom line, others wanted in.

Hanlon’s time had finally arrived.

Hanlon became mayor.

Hanlon was beset by everything that Ragucci left behind which made running city hall a difficult and complex matter.

Hanlon did his best. He, too, shown loyalty to those who had showed it to him and he made the best effort he could to manage a difficult political base and the residue of the Ragucci era.

Enter Carlo DeMaria.

He  took over the city when the national economy was at its very best.

From there on, the economy dove.

Three years ago, it was nearly hitting bottom.

DeMaria was undaunted.

The city continued to change. Everyone knew the chips were down with the economy, so the tendency wasn’t to blame DeMaria.

DeMaria has shown himself to be a bit of an artist, a magician, almost.

The mayor, it seems, has mastered running the city without upsetting very many people.

He is so likeable, that most voters find it impossible to muster the energy to dislike him or whatever it is he is doing to keep the city running smoothly.

And the city has changed to such a great extent, that the old political constituencies such as Ragucci’s, Hanlon’s and even DeMaria’s are nearly all united and willing to confront the city’s difficulties rather than to fight.

Councillor Peter Napolitano has been telling people he is thinking about running for mayor.

It is a nice thought, running for mayor of Everett.

But DeMaria’s proven skills at running the city and keeping the voters and homeowners happy, will be a long yard to overcome.

The mayor’s time will one-day come. He, like his predecessors, will one-day run a campaign, do everything right, make all the correct moves, and be tossed out of office.

But that day is probably not now.

DeMaria is mid-way into his career at Everett City Hall as mayor.

He’s enjoying his position.

The people are happy with him and what’s more, they like him as a person.

He’s going nowhere and will likely be the city’s first four year mayor when the Charter Review changes politics here forever.