Madness, again

November 9, 2010
By

The stabbing death of an Everett young man over the weekend in front of a popular Main Street pizzeria once again reminds all of us of how out of control deadly violence has tended to become in the last year in our urban centers.

The homicide in front of a local Pizzeria is stunning because it apparently began over nothing and escalated into a fistfight and finally culminated in the stabbing death of a man who had two children and a wife.

According to sources, the dead man was stabbed in the heart and was dead on arrival at the Whidden Hospital.

The viral wave of homicides recently affecting Boston and Chelsea has now come to Everett, where local police are baffled over the changing nature of the violence experienced on the streets where we live and walk and shop everyday.

What used to be drug induced violence and mayhem has morphed into the inexplicable – that is – execution type violence with either a knife or a gun.

Certain individuals now believe it is permissible to kill people who look at them the wrong way or who passed them by and touched them by accident.

The violence has gotten so crazy and so out of the realm of sanity that many of us have come to expect it.

In fact, senseless executions at gunpoint or with a knife have become so commonplace that we have become numb to it.

There is no way to anesthetize ourselves against this new wave of execution type violence.

We must all be vigilant.

The police must maintain their vigilance, as we know they do.

But there is a strong element of hopelessness in all of this.

Police standing on every corner of the city at the same time can’t stop people who feel they have nothing to lose from committing a random execution such as the fatal stabbing.

That being said, we face a new evil that is growing.

The social scientists and people like Boston’s Mayor Tom Menino make the justifiable claim that the most recent wave of horrific executions are caused by fractured families more than drugs, by children growing up without role models of mothers or fathers or mentors to show them the way.

When young people have nothing to lose society loses, as it did Sunday evening outside a local pizza parlor on Main Street.

  • frustrated in everett

    I have lived in Everett for the past 10 years and when we first moved to the city I would think nothing of venturing out at night to the store if I needed anything . I stopped doing that about 6 years ago just never felt comfortable with the city’s changing neighborhoods. I would like to move but who is going to buy my house and how much are we going to be able to sell it for.

    It is too bad we can’t attract more professionals who work in Boston and want an easy commute. We need to advertise the city as an an attractive place to come and live and yes even raise a family.