Boys soccer team ties Xaverian, 3-3

September 22, 2010
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The Everett High boys soccer team earned a 3-3 tie with non league rival Xaverian Monday in a contest that featured some “unusual” refereeing calls, to put it kindly.

Although a red card was called on a Xaverian player early in the game, the ref allowed Xaverian to substitute a player for the offending player. Under international soccer rules, including high school, a red card should mean that the team not only loses that player, but has to play a man down for the rest of the game.

The Crimson Tide then saw a potential win slip from their hands when a penalty kick was awarded to Xaverian with about five minutes to play for a reason that never was discernible to Coach Fred Jannino and his team. The conversion by Xaverian of the PK knotted matters at 3-3.

Everett had spotted Xaverian a 2-0 lead after the first half, but then stormed back with three goals after the intermission to take a 3-2 advantage. Senior Captain David Lima potted two markers and Edwin Martinez added the third goal. The duo also assisted on each other’s goals.

The Crimson Tide opened their season on a promising note two weeks ago with a 5-1 win over GBL foe Malden. Gabe Moya reached the back of the net twice with teammates Walles Nogueria, junior Captain Eric Chajon, and Lima also joining in the goal scoring parade.

Sandwiched in between those two contests were a tough 1-0 loss to Malden Catholic, in which the lone goal was an “own goal” when an Everett player inadvertently kicked the ball into his own net while trying to clear it, and a 5-1 defeat to GBL rival Cambridge. Martinez accounted for the lone Everett marker against the Cantabs.

The soccer boys host Somerville this Friday under the lights at the Stadium at 7:00. They

will travel to St. John’s Prep Monday and then to Medford next Wednesday.

  • William

    NFHS (High School) rules do not follow the FIFA Laws of the Game and, instead, write their own rulebook. Under NFHS, there are 2 infractions in which a player receiving a red card may be replaced:

    (1) any delayed, excessive, or prolonged act(s) by which a player(s) attempt to focus attention upon himself/herself and/or prohibits a timely restart of the game.
    (2) a subsequent [2nd] caution.

    The correct referee mechanic is to show the yellow and red cards simultaneously, in this case. I find it likely a spectator could miss the double-card if not specifically looking for it. It is not specified in the article what the misconduct call was for, but I suspect that the referee might know a bit more than the author.

    This, in my mind, brings into question his other statements, such as “when a penalty kick was awarded to Xaverian with about five minutes to play for a reason that never was discernible to Coach Fred Jannino and his team.” I find that the coach of the player who committed the foul often has trouble discerning the reason.

    USSF and NFHS referee