Looking at Politics – Galluccio’s demise is a loss to Everett

January 7, 2010
By

There are two Anthony Galluccios.

The Anthony Galluccio depicted on television Monday afternoon in court in a suit, with his head down, being led away in handcuffs for violating his probation is not the Anthony Galluccio we know and whom we like.

That person who spent much of his adult life helping the working person and the disadvantaged is now a prisoner behind bars.

Alcohol is apparently the culprit, the demon Galluccio was unable to confront.

At the court hearing in Medford, Galluccio tried to convince a tough judge that his toothpaste was responsible for tripping the Breathalyzer.

The tough judge wouldn’t have it – nor would most clear thinking people because the Breathalyzer doesn’t lie.

Those of us watching the spectacle of Galluccio’s hearing on television heard the senator trying to convince the judge: “I don’t know why the machine said I had been drinking. I haven’t been drinking.”

The senator was clearly not himself uttering those words.

The judge simply didn’t believe him.

He was evading the reality of his situation to the point where the judge ordered him jailed, the handcuffs were placed on his wrists and he was led away to the lock-up.

Now he faces either resigning his position or having it stripped from him by his senate colleagues.

He also faces losing the right to practice law – but that will come later.

For the people of Everett, Galluccio’s demise is a real loss.

He was a friend to this city and to its youth and to its struggling people from all walks of life.

“Anthony was always doing good for others,” said Mayor Carlo DeMaria. “We are all saddened by this situation,” he said.

In Everett, Galluccio was well known, well liked and highly respected.

He understood people. He reached out. He took a real interest in what he was doing – and he loved being senator.

All of that is now locked into a cell in the Middlesex County Jail in Cambridge.

It is sad beyond belief that all of Anthony Galluccio’s ambitions and desire to do good for others could lead to this.

  • I’ve been a friend of Anthony for 17 years and a Cambridge resident for 32 years. This has been tough to witness for many of us.

    I’m glad to see the Everett Independent seeing this for the loss that it represents and not as the circus so many others have made of this terrible situation. I wish our lesser excuse of a local paper in Cambridge had as much class as the Everett Independent.