Hazing compliance important

October 3, 2009
By

The School Committee reported last week that it is in compliance with Chapter 269: Section 17 of the state laws.

This is the law against hazing and or organizing or participating in hazing and it defines hazing as well.

Hazing at the high school level has generally has been confined to sports teams and as part of initiation rituals into other organizations.

Hazing is outlawed everywhere in the state of Massachusetts, and especially in Everett, according to the School Committee.

If one is convicted of a hazing crime, they can be fined $3,000 and imprisoned for one year.

Hazing means any conduct or method of initiation into any student organization, whether on public or private property, which willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or other person.

This includes conduct such as whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, exposure to weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance, or any other brutal treatment or forced physical activity which is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety or any such student or persons, or which subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress, including extended deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation.

In addition, the School Committee has insured, as the law requires, that any incidents considered hazing must be reported, and that those at the scene of an incident must report it as well.

Failure to report an incident or such a crime will be fined not more than $1,000.

The School Committee has made certain that each institution of secondary education in the city is apprised of this law and this law in its detail, is distributed to members, plebes, pledges or applicants for membership on teams and in groups.

The anti-hazing law protects younger people in this city.

It is a good law – and it is paid attention to scrupulously here in this city.